New vs Old Ithaca 37?

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Copper BB
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:49 pm
I want to purchase an Ithaca 37, part for hunting and maybe home defense.

Are the new ones as well made, reliable, and long lasting as the older ones? Why or why not?

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:00 pm
Welcome aboard,

I own one from just about every era of Ithaca. Except an Ohio gun. The plan is to own a new one soon.
That said from the things I hear about the new ones they are made as well if not better than an older model.

With proper care it will be passed on to future generations.

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:35 pm
I have model 37's going from first year production up threw a pair of his and hers 20 gauges we picked up a couple of years ago. Have not had a single problem with the Ohio guns ever. The new Ohio Ithaca has taken to machining of the new model 37's to a whole new level. The receivers are CNC machined on one machine something that the model 37 had never seen before. My understanding is that the earlier guns where machined in steps on several machines. This process produced some variances from gun to gun. The remaining internal parts are all CNC machined as well with tolerances closer that they have ever been before. As I recall the new guns require virtually no "hand fitting". Now for the barrels. They to are CNC machined from a blank as well. The vent rib stanchions are machined into the barrel during this process. The rib is then set into a dove tail in the front and a set screw secures it in the back. There is a dove tail machined into the bottom of the barrel to set the barrel lug into. The reason for this process is there is no heat introduced to the barrel for braising of the under-lug or solder for the vent rib giving you a barrel that is straight as an arrow. The long and the short of it is in my opinion the Ohio Ithaca guns are as well produced if not better that the New York Ithaca and if you buy one of the new ones you get the warranty on the slim chance that you will need it.

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 7:16 am
Really? that's good to hear. Where can I find more information on the new Ithacas? Or reviews?

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 6:52 pm
I would start with the Ithaca Gun web sight.

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 10:03 am
Well, I'd really like to get independent information of people who have bought and shot their new production Ithacas a lot.

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:27 pm
There are a few independent reviews posted on their web site. The folks at Ithaca also take the guns out for field testing as well. My understanding is at first the rib was attached with just a set screw. After taking the guns to Argentina to shoot doves the set screw would break with this high volume of shooting. That is when they added the dove tail for the rib. There has been a trap version of the 37 out for a couple of years now. Someone just posted what they thought of it in just the last week or so. Perhaps a trap forum would have some helpful information as well. The long and short of it is at least in my opinion is this. First it must be a good design or the gun would not have been in more or less constant production since 1921 when the Remington model 17 was introduced (the precursor of the model 37). Second the Ohio Ithaca is still in business for about 5 years and seems to be doing well. Not bad when you consider that you could go to a big box store and pick up a 870 Express or a Mossberg 500 for about half the cost of an Ithaca.

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 9:50 pm
Check out Randy Wakeman's website. He did a review a while back I believe. Like Randy or loath Randy he pulls no punches, nor does he carry water for anyone. He gave the new Ithaca, bith field guns and defense guns glowing reviews. And he was no lover at all of the New York Ithacas. I believe he declared the HD version to be the best one compared to similar 870's and Mossbergs.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:30 am
He certainly has strong opinions. Agree or disagree, he's never sold out or pulled punches and I highly respect that. His reviews are always good reading
--Jim

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 3:10 pm
Sometimes things that set him off I can live with, and things he can live with I don't like. But ain't that how it always is? Now he's not short on criticism of the old Ithacas at all, but he speaks glowingly of the new ones. But you're right I respect a feller who'll say what he thinks and not carry water for any company.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:37 am
That is why I read gun tests as well. They accept no advertising and can be very blunt. They make no bones over what they like and don't like.

I remember a few years ago, Remington came out with a Bottom Eject semi auto. I don't remeber the name, but it was a jumble of letters and numbers. It was ultra modern with carbon graphite and alloys. It got glowing reviews from all the major mags. Just glowing. Turns out, the thing is did best was jam. In fact, about all it did was jam. It was so bad that Remington discontinued it soon after. So why didn't the big mags say this? They HAD to have seen it jam, but not a peep. I wonder if they even shoot 'em when they review them.
--Jim

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 5:51 am
The Remington CTi soon replaced with the CTi II. Yes I like gun test too. I used to get excited reading the gun reviews in magazines, even in the NRA publications. That is until they all started to sound the same. Every gun was great. Hmmmmm could that really be the truth ya think?
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:04 am
That's it, Col, the CTi! Good Catch! Gads, what a dog! I can't believe Remington actually released that thing. What is worse, I can't believe anyone called it anything other than a doorstop.

Gun test is great. Sometimes some of their negatives, I consider a plus, but hey, at least it is an honest stake in the ground. I think Gun test reviewed the CTi and mentioned its ability to jam.

I noticed that the CTi II is not featured on the Remington site anymore either.
--Jim

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 3:00 pm
There are very few guys over on SGW who have a CTi II and love it. They say that the II was a lot better and a decent gun, but that the first edition was so bad that it scared the concept forever. I don't know. Maybe they were just the lucky ones who actually got one that worked. I loved the concept when it first came out, but I hear that it was very load sensitive.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:12 pm
A bad rep is all you need. as much as bottom eject works with a pump, I think it is a but too iffy on a semi auto.

But it is funny how all the reviewers loved it. Did they even shoot it???
--Jim

.22LR
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 6:24 pm
I've shot several early Ithaca's. Not a problem with any of them. I've heard the mid 70's version of the company put out some of the most complained about products. I do remember seeing one years ago and I'd have to agree, although I don't remember the details anymore.

I presently have been playing with one of Sandusky's Defenders. I'm not sure what to think as of yet. The innards are obviously more crudely finshed than the 60's versions. Sharp edges and machine marks.
The gun arrived NIB unable to fire, probally due to a broken firing pin. Sent it back in.
The company repair shop DID make the firing pin work, listened to my concerns, and even D&T'd the receiver for a rail. Truly enjoyed talking to the repair folks.
However while the gun now fires, it has very unreliable extraction with various brands of shells. It will fail to extract 1 in every 6 rounds or more. So it's going back to Ohio when I get a chance.

It's the version with a full mag tube. While I haven't put it on a scale yet, it seems noticably heavier than any other Ithaca I shot. Even those with LONG barrels or choke devices on the end. It just doesn't seem to balance as well as the older versions.

I'm waiting to see if they make it right before I come to any final decisions on the beastie.

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