a good clay bird shootin gun


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 9:12 am
[*hey guys im new on here and im not sure if this question has been answered before, but im curious to which ithaca model shotgun would be the best for breaking clays? Im not entering competitively but i do plan on heading to the range every other weekend to bust some clays. Id like to know what ithaca could stand a decently high volume of shells. My grandfather gave me his 20gauge model 37 featherlight a couple years ago as a gift and it works amazing busting clays, but im looking for somethin that maybe is new from ithaca so i dont have to use the 20 so hard. Im curious to know two other things. The first of which is does the quality of a new ithaca model 37 featherlight nowadays even hold a candle to the supeeb quality of say the 50's and 60's? And second, is ithaca really planning on coming out with a.new o/u shotgun? I believe its called the.phoenix? Thanks guys i look forward to the replies.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 5:51 pm
Well, WHichever is the best target gun is a highly debatable answer. If you like what you have and want a newer version, I would say to get the same thing. The new ones are made exactly the same way and they put in the same quality at they did when it was first introduced, albeit with some minor improvements. First, the removeable rib is a fantastic thing and they switched the hinge screw for one of the cartridge stops for a pin but otherwise all of the major parts are the same. the bluing is flawless and the engraving is real machine engraving rather than being roll pressed, so I would say you would be getting as good, if not better in some ways.

There will be an over/under. When is anyone's guess, but one will be coming out. The expected retail price will be around $2800, but I am sure you will be able to do better at your finer dealers'
--Jim

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:47 pm
One thing to remember is that the reason theres so many Ithacas around is that they were made to last lifetimes. If your gun has strong sentimental value I say use it. If it breaks, fix it. They were made to be used, not abused, so shottin some clays once a month shouldnt do anything but give you a big smile. The best part is that parts are available and theres very skilled gunsmiths around :) Putting a gun on the wall is like leavin a bird dog in the kennel for fear he'll get hurt.

If in doubt, ask your granddad. My money is he'll say "use it".
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:01 pm
Simpleman wrote:One thing to remember is that the reason theres so many Ithacas around is that they were made to last lifetimes. If your gun has strong sentimental value I say use it. If it breaks, fix it. They were made to be used, not abused, so shottin some clays once a month shouldnt do anything but give you a big smile. The best part is that parts are available and theres very skilled gunsmiths around :) Putting a gun on the wall is like leavin a bird dog in the kennel for fear he'll get hurt.

If in doubt, ask your granddad. My money is he'll say "use it".



that is a good analogy. I mean I do have a few that I bought for collectable purposes, but most of mine are shooters. If I can't use it, I may as well sell it to somebody who can.
--Jim

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:36 am
All of the above advice is excellent. I have a 1952 plain barrel, modified choke 20 gauge, and it is a wonderful skeet gun. Would have had a 25x25 last week, but I shoot Original Skeet (low gun, delayed pull) and missed two targets on station 8. A bit too quick for my 76 year old reflexes. I just bought a new 28 gauge (A grade, 26" barrel), and it shoots exactly like the 20. Same weight, same fit and feel, wonderful balance for skeet or upland hunting, action smooth as glass, light trigger, beautiful fit and finish...almost no recoil. Your grandad would certainly be proud that you were shooting his gun (bet you can't wear it out in a lifetime), but if you are looking for a new Ithaca, the 28 gauge is worth a look. FYI, I patterned the Briley IC choke in mine, and it throws WONDERFULLY uniform Light Modified patterns. I am reloading Unique powder and the original 28 gauge loading of 5/8 ounce of 8 1/2 shot in the old AA hull. The target breaks are equal to the 20 gauge with 7/8 ounce of shot.

There is no other pump gun on the market equal to the new Ithaca's.

Ron
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New ithaca 3728.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:00 pm
a 23 on low gun? That is still dang good! Your 28 looks great! glad you enjoy it!
--Jim
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 4:52 pm
Welcome to the Ithaca Owners Forum JREIBER !!
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:52 pm
During world war II a number of 12 gauge Ithaca model 37s with 30 inch full choke barrels where use to train tail gunners on the bombers. They would put the gunners on flat bed trucks and drive while they shot at clays. If the US government can trust these guns to see that much action then I sure can.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 12:29 am
Now I'm not one to ever dissuade anyone from buying another shotgun. But if you like the one your granddad gave you and you shoot it well, use it. You won't wear it out, your grandkids maybe, but not you.

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