1937 model 37 question

Moderator: ripjack13


Copper BB
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:57 pm
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 5:34 pm
Howdy everyone,

This is my first time to ever even post on any sort of forum so forgive me if I screw up anything

I recently picked up a used Ithaca model 37 from the local Gander Mountain, it wasn't in the best shape, and I payed more than I probably should've, so why did I buy it? the serial number. It has an SN of 2868, meaning it was manufactured in 1937, but I think the for end may not be stock and wanted some information, its not a corncob for end and I have no idea what for end a 1937 model 37 would have, also, if I were to decide to sell this gun, what do you think would be a good asking price (I have no intention of ever selling this gun, just want an estimate). I would love to post some pictures, but I don't know how to and couldn't find a guide. Any information will be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance

Copper BB
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:57 pm
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 5:55 pm
I emailed Ithaca gun co. and they said they had no way of knowing, just got through cleaning it, since the last owner obviously didn't believe in doing so, haven't gotten to shoot it yet, maybe this weekend. Figured out how to post pictures (I think), so here they are (hopefully).

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.270 WIN
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Location: phila pa
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 6:15 pm
the foregrip looks time correct.its hard too tell ,but i get the impression that the wood was pretty nice

nice find ,
by any chance does the engravings look hand touched?

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:20 pm
The fore arm is the pre-war style that would be correct for your first year production gun. Nice find! As far as value it depends on who you are trying to sell it to. To a collector mabey about $500. To some one looking for a light weight hunting gun about $250. Now for the million dollar question. How many extractors are on the bolt. One on the bottom only or one on the top and bottom. Early guns just had one but most of them where sent back to the factory and updated with dual extractors due to shells sticking in the chamber.

Copper BB
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:57 pm
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:23 pm
Well thanks for the quick replies, but twistedoak I don't what "hand touched" engravings are, does it mean it was done by hand? and how can I tell?

1977cutcher, I'm not really sure what I'm look for on the extractor part, but it looks like there are two extractors, one on top and bottom, I can't get a decent picture of it for the life of me, but what difference would that make to the gun?

I knew when I bought it I was overpaying for it, I just really wanted to be able to say that I own a 1937 model 37
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.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 9:16 pm
when they first started making 37s not all the engravings were "crisp" enough.
those that werent were touched up by hand.
its hard to describe , but if you seen a normal reciver and a touched reciever side by side you could pick out the touched one.bit more detail ,sharper lines etc

hand touched recievers don't really effect gun price , but does boost collectability.

single extractor guns are extreamly rare to find and there are only a few unaltered guns know to exist

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:24 pm
If it looks as though you have two extractors than you probably have two. Another way to tell is if you have two notches in the barrel where the threads starts. Your picture of the serial number on the barrel shows the bottom notch nicely. If you have one on the top side of the barrel you will know for sure that you have two extractors. BUT if you have a single extractor gun you would be able to "name your price" to a collector.

Copper BB
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:57 pm
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:14 pm
well it definitely has 2 extractors then, I did a side by side comparison on the engravings with my 1950 M37, the engravings seem to be a little deeper on the 1937, but that may just because my 1950 isn't in the best condition. there doesn't seem to be any real difference in the amount of detail or cleanliness of the lines, so if it has the same detail of a later model, I'd imagine it was hand touched, could be wrong though. Thanks again for all the info, its always fun to learn more about these guns.
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 9:33 pm
Welcome to the Ithaca Owners Forum aharkey !!

Nice find...
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Vendor
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:23 am
I just saw a 37 that was made in 1939 go for $700, so I would say to a collector, it would go for at least that. Considering the age, it is an outstanding example of a first year gun!
--Jim

.22LR
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2012 9:56 am
I thought they went to a double extractor about SN 2500 but double checking Walts book I find they went to double extractors at #2200.
So double extractors and looks of the wood it looks to me like an original first year 37

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2012 3:57 pm
Every now and again I run into a gun that does not match up exactly with factory records. It seems as though some of the records allowed for a margin of error. I knew the gun was a little late for the single extractor but I figured it was worth a shot. Either way there where only 3,500 first year guns so it is a delight to hear about one when it "turns up".
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:32 am
1977cutcher wrote:Every now and again I run into a gun that does not match up exactly with factory records. It seems as though some of the records allowed for a margin of error. I knew the gun was a little late for the single extractor but I figured it was worth a shot. Either way there where only 3,500 first year guns so it is a delight to hear about one when it "turns up".



Sometimes in manufacturing You will grab "available parts" trying to meet a deadline or a big order.
That would account for variations in serial number records.
--Jim

.22LR
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 7:28 pm
Your new/old 37 is just the kind of gun I like to find. You've got a lot of gunk on the wood. If you scrub it lightly with furniture soap it will come up and not hurt the wood. Sometimes, if the wood is bad enough I strip it with Jasco Paint Remover and then touch it lightly with wet sand paper. I wet the wood first so that the fine "hairs" stand up, then I take them down. I restain it and put on some kind of varnish. If you buy one of those stock refinishing kits it will work fine. However don't overdue it. You don't want too much sheen, more like a dull glow.

I have a 37 that looks as if the rolled engraving has indeed been touched up.

While I try not to pay too much for a gun, I sometimes do. Usually the value of your gun will catch up with what you paid for it. Just enjoy your gun. I think it is great.

The forearm looks "right" to me.

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